Interesting PHP Facts, You May Not Know

Hello guys,

I would like to share some interesting facts about PHP which every web developer should know. These facts can also be very important for the beginners as it will give them a basic overall understanding of this useful language and also for experienced developers who are unaware about it.

  1. PHP originally stood for Personal Home Page.
  2. PHP was originally designed to replace a set of Perl scripts to maintain Personal Home Pages (also known as PHP).
  3. PHP which is now officially known as ‘Hypertext Preprocessor’ was released in the year 1995.
  4. PHP 3 was official launched in June 1998.
  5. PHP is free software released under the PHP License, which is incompatible with the GNU General Public License (GPL) due to restrictions on the use of the term PHP.
  6. PHP was originally designed to create dynamic and more interactive web pages. It is the most widely-used, open-source and general-purpose scripting language.
  7. It is possible to use PHP in almost every operating system. PHP can be used in all major operating systems including Linux, Microsoft Windows, Mac OS X, and RISC OS.
  8. PHP uses procedural programming or object oriented programming and also a mixture of them.
  9. Some of the biggest online brands, such as Facebook, ProProfs, Digg, Friendster, Flickr, Technorati, and Yahoo! are powered by PHP.
  10. PHP is installed on over 20 million websites and 1 million web servers.
  11. 75% of Web 2.0 sites are built in PHP.
  12. There are about 6 million PHP developers worldwide.

Start Development with Android Studio

This is the first post on “How to start developing Android Apps with Android Studio”.

This post will ensure full n final installation of Android Studio on your local Machine. In the further posts we will discuss, creating app, coding, layout design, connectivity, sensors, animation etc.

So…this is going to be very much happening…stay tuned with us.

Downloading Android Studio –


It can be downloaded from below link.

Download Android Studio link

Installing Android Studio –


After Downloading Android Studio executable on your machine, our next step is to installing. So here is the step by step guide to install it.

Step 1 – Double click on executable. You will see the screen like below.

step1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 2 – Click “Next” and you will see the below screen.

step2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 3 – Click “next” and you will see the Terms and condition screen.

step3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 4 – Click on “I Agree” Button and you will see the below screen.

step4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 5 – Here you have to choose installation path. Choose wisely. Where you have free space. More space will be needed for Emulator also. So choose where you have free space. Then click on “Next” and you will see the below screen.

Step6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 6 – Select how much “RAM” you want to allocate for you Android Emulator. Give as much as you can for smooth running. Range lies between 512-1GB.

Click “Next” and the below screen will be shown –

Step7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 7 – Here you have to Select What should be the Menu folder in “Start Menu” for Android Studio.

Click “Install” to start the installation.

Step8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 9 – Click “Next” after Installation gets completed. You will see the below screen.

step10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Congratulationsssss !!!!!

Installation has completed. This is the very first step to start developing Android Apps. Keep visiting us for more articles on Developing App code.

In next Article we will start making the Apps.

Thanks for reading.

 

Author

Pankaj Goel

Introducing Dreamweaver

Dreamweaver 8 is a easy to use software that allows you to create professional web Pages.
The design edition features of Dreamweaver 8 allow you to quickly add objects and functionality to your pages, without having to program the HTML code manually.
It’s possible to create tables, edit frames, work with layers, insert JavaScript behaviors, etc., in a very simple and visual way.
In addition, it includes a complete FTP client software, allowing among other things to work with visual maps of the Web sites, and updating the Web site in the server without leaving the program.
In order to follow this course you can download the trial version of Dreamweaver from the Macromedia’s Page, this version expires after 30 days, but you can surely at some stage bring yourself to buy the full version of this wonderful program.
If you don’t know the basic HTML characteristics you can see them here

3D Animation

3D animation consists of varying properties of a 3 dimensional scene defined in numerical quantities. A 3D model can change properties such as position, rotation, shape and surface style. An animated 3D scene is defined by the change of these numerical properties through time. Apart from 3D objects, a scene contains a camera (point of view) and lights which can also be animated. In order to create an animation each “state” of the 3D scene needs to be rendered to create a frame. The playback of these individual renderings at a certain rate (24, 25 30 frames per second) creates the illusion of animation. As all properties are defined numerically, one can take advantage of various processes for automating the process of generating different “states” for each frame. A central notion to animation is the use of “keyframes”; with its origin in classic (paper-based) animation; keyframes allow for the definition of the main “states” in a particular movement or action while the continuity between these states is generated. In classic animation these in-between frames would be drawn by “junior” animators. In 3D animation and other forms of computer animation, these frames are generated by interpolating between the numerical values that are defined in any two consecutive keyframes. Typically, in 3D animation this interpolation takes the form of 3 dimensional Bézier curves (paths) which are constructed as a series of control points, allowing for the interactive manipulation of smooth 3D curves.

Controlling your PC Remotely using “Chrome Remote Desktop” for Android

Have you ever been somewhere and urgently you need a file stored in your home computer ? This is very common situation that most of us deal with, but now rather returning home and get it, Google has offered a better solution for this problem.

Google – one of the most innovative Tech companies on the planer, famous for providing new technologies to make every job easy for its users, has released Google’s Chrome Remote Desktop service today for your Android Smartphones to remotely control your PC any time, from anywhere.

Google’s Chrome Remote Desktop app for Android provides an easier and secure interaction of your computer with your Android Smartphones. So using this app you can control your desktop system or PC remotely from anywhere using your Android Smartphone, provided your Mac, windows or Linux system has Chrome Remote Desktop app installed and running.

Google first introduced this service in 2011, which allowed users of Chrome OS or Chrome browser to remotely access their personal computers back home in a free, easy and secure way and now they have released this feature for Android devices to make the same thing possible for Android users.

How To Use It :->
Continue reading Controlling your PC Remotely using “Chrome Remote Desktop” for Android

Introduction to Flash

Adobe Flash was created in 1996 as a way to display rich media on a webpage. In the mid-90s, most websites were a collection of static pages that displayed only text and images. When Flash was introduced, it opened a new world of animation and interactivity to the Web. People were able to create moving animations and clickable interactive graphics that went beyond the capabilities of standard HTML and CSS.
Flash was – and still is – owned by a single company, which is now Adobe. This means that Flash is proprietary software, and is not an open standard on the Web.
Journalists wishing to use Flash for adding interactivity to a website must weigh the pros and cons and decide the best tool to use for telling a story.
Here are some of the pros for using Flash on a website:

  • Quickly create rich interactive graphics using a timeline-based software tool.
  • Utilize a number of pre-built libraries and classes to build sophisticated projects that might otherwise take longer to build from scratch.
  • A cross-browser compatible tool that works the same on Internet Explore, Firefox, Mozilla, Opera and Chrome.
  • Good for construction of data-intense animated data visualizations that need to access an online database.

Here are some of the cons when using Flash:

  • Does not work on a multitude of mobile smartphone devices.
  • Many touch-screen devices (i.e. tablet computers) require different types of interaction that aren’t often supported by most Flash projects. For example, the difference between a mouse roll-over, and a tap, touch or swipe.
  • Does not conform to the open standards of the web as defined by the World Wide Web Consortium, thus it does not promote a standardized open Internet.
  • Issues regarding accessibility of content for persons using special tools like screen readers.
  • In some cases, intensive use of Flash graphics can drain the battery life on many laptops and mobile devices.
  • Not as optimized for search engines (SEO). Flash is a closed multimedia construct on most webpages making it difficult for some search engines to properly index.

When deciding to build Flash project, we dissuade journalists from creating entire websites in Flash. Instead, think of Flash as a single embedable element on a webpage surrounded by text and navigation that is coded in HTML, like a video embeded on the YouTube page. Creating entire websites in Flash contradicts a lot of the standards of webpages, like a common navigation or the back button in the browser. While some of these can be mitigated, in most cases creating entire websites in Flash are often frowned upon by many web experts.

3D Animation: An Introduction

3D animation consists of varying properties of a 3 dimensional scene defined in numerical quantities. A 3D model can change properties such as position, rotation, shape and surface style. An animated 3D scene is defined by the change of these numerical properties through time. Apart from 3D objects, a scene contains a camera (point of view) and lights which can also be animated. In order to create an animation each “state” of the 3D scene needs to be rendered to create a frame. The playback of these individual renderings at a certain rate (24, 25 30 frames per second) creates the illusion of animation. As all properties are defined numerically, one can take advantage of various processes for automating the process of generating different “states” for each frame. A central notion to animation is the use of “keyframes”; with its origin in classic (paper-based) animation; keyframes allow for the definition of the main “states” in a particular movement or action while the continuity between these states is generated. In classic animation these in-between frames would be drawn by “junior” animators. In 3D animation and other forms of computer animation, these frames are generated by interpolating between the numerical values that are defined in any two consecutive keyframes. Typically, in 3D animation this interpolation takes the form of 3 dimensional Bézier curves (paths) which are constructed as a series of control points, allowing for the interactive manipulation of smooth 3D curves.

Interface and Control

The computer-intensive process of generating hundreds of rendered images together with the difficulty and labour-intensive processes required for defining 3 dimensional movements makes the exploration of 3D animation the almost exclusive property of large budget film and TV productions.
The recent development of various automation algorithms together with the increasing power of Desktop computers make it possible to create very high quality animations with software such as 3D Studio Max and Electric Image.
Apart from the basic properties of movement (changes in the position of a particular object), rotation and scale, there are tools which provide higher levels of control for the animation of one or more objects in a particular scene.
Deformation tools can be applied to virtually any object; by defining a notional cube around an object; its points can serve as paths for transformations such as twisting, bulging the lines between two points, bending etc… The transformation of the notional cube is then applied to the faces, points and lined of the object “inside”. Two states of this deformation process can be used as key frames for the generation of an animated twist or bend.
This linear type of transformation is often a long way away from the realistic movement required in most professional animation. In order to simulate “real world” behaviours several tools provide various definitions for the interdependence between two or more objects; in a 3D model consisting of two objects, a hierarchy can be defined in such a way that one object always “looks” at the other (i.e. the rotation parameter of one object is derived from the position of the other). This kind of behaviour can be applied to a spotlight following a particular object, thus automating the animation of one of the objects necessary to create a “realistic” 3D scene.
Similarly, physical laws can be applied to an object in order to modulate its movement; e.g. gravity will automatically make an object fall on to the ground plane at a speed dependant on the object’s mass.

Introduction to Adobe Photoshop Creative

Introduction to Adobe Photoshop CC is ideal for users who want to learn key Photoshop concepts and techniques in a hands on lab and focused setting. More experienced users who already have some experience with Photoshop can use this course to learn some of Photoshop CC’s more advanced features and newest tools.
Using step-by-step, project-based lessons, this course walks users through the creation of a specific project, with successive lessons building on the user’s growing knowledge of the program.
What you will learn

  • Getting to know the Work Area
  • Basic photo corrections
  • Working with Selections
  • Layer basics
  • Masks and channels
  • Correcting and enhancing digital photographs
  • Typographic design
  • Vector drawing techniques
  • Editing Video
  • Advanced compositing
  • Painting with the Mixer Brush
  • Working with 3D images
  • Preparing files for web
  • Producing and Printing Consistent colour

ASP.Net Introduction

ASP.Net is a web development platform, which provides a programming model, a comprehensive software infrastructure and various services required to build up robust web application for PC, as well as mobile devices.
ASP.Net works on top of the HTTP protocol and uses the HTTP commands and policies to set a browser-to-server two-way communication and cooperation.
ASP.Net is a part of Microsoft .Net platform. ASP.Net applications are complied codes, written using the extensible and reusable components or objects present in .Net framework. These codes can use the entire hierarchy of classes in .Net framework.
The ASP.Net application codes could be written in either of the following languages:

  • C#
  • Visual Basic .Net
  • Jscript
  • J#

ASP.Net is used to produce interactive, data-driven web applications over the internet. It consists of a large number of controls like text boxes, buttons and labels for assembling, configuring and manipulating code to create HTML pages.

ASP.Net Web Forms Model

ASP.Net web forms extend the event-driven model of interaction to the web applications. The browser submits a web form to the web server and the server returns a full markup page or HTML page in response.
All client side user activities are forwarded to the server for stateful processing. The server processes the output of the client actions and triggers the reactions.
Now, HTTP is a stateless protocol. ASP.Net framework helps in storing the information regarding the state of the application, which consists of:

  • Page state
  • Session state

The page state is the state of the client, i.e., the content of various input fields in the web form. The session state is the collective obtained from various pages the user visited and worked with, i.e., the overall session state. To clear the concept, let us take up an example of a shopping cart as follows.
User adds items to a shopping cart. Items are selected from a page, say the items page, and the total collected items and price are shown in a different page, say the cart page. Only HTTP cannot keep track of all the information coming from various pages. ASP.Net session state and server side infrastructure keeps track of the information collected globally over a session.
The ASP.Net runtime carries the page state to and from the server across page requests while generating the ASP.Net runtime codes and incorporates the state of the server side components in hidden fields.
This way the server becomes aware of the overall application state and operates in a two-tiered connected way.

Android Introduction

To develop apps for Android devices, you use a set of tools that are included in the Android SDK. Once you’ve downloaded and installed the SDK, you can access these tools right from your Eclipse IDE, through the ADT plugin, or from the command line. Developing with Eclipse is the preferred method because it can directly invoke the tools that you need while developing applications.
However, you may choose to develop with another IDE or a simple text editor and invoke the tools on the command line or with scripts. This is a less streamlined way to develop because you will sometimes have to call command line tools manually, but you will have access to the same number of features that you would have in Eclipse.